Today in History

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African National Congress (ANC). Photo: Moeketsi Mogotsi

1991 ANC’s economic plans

African National Congress (ANC) Deputy President Nelson Mandela stated that his party was prepared to abandon its long-held policy of nationalisation if the business community could provide an alternative which would redress the economic imbalances in the country.

He further stated that nationalisation did not mean that the private sector would be excluded from certain areas of business, and said that the ANC welcomed dialogue with the business sector to ensure growth and equal distribution.

Two days later the ANC released a report which recognised the important role of foreign investment and reassured foreign corporations that they would be free to take their profits out of the country under an ANC government

African National Congress (ANC) logo
African National Congress (ANC) logo

1987 Wynand Malan leads the newly formed National Democratic Movement

Former National Party (NP) member of parliament, Wynand Malan, lead the newly formed Afrikaans dominated political party, the National Democratic Movement (NDM), which was to develop contacts with Black politicians.

In 1988 a meeting was held between the African National Congress (ANC) and the NDM during which common ground on the protection of language, culture and religion and the protection of individual rights in a multi-party democracy was reached.

In 1989, three years after its formation, the NDM merged with the National Democratic Movement (NDM)and the Independent Party (ID) to form the Democratic Party (DP), which has since changed its name to the Democratic Alliance (DA).

Former National Party (NP) member of parliament, Wynand Malan/sahistory.org
Former National Party (NP) member of parliament, Wynand Malan/sahistory.org

1968 SA to be admitted to the African Games provided that competitions in SA are held without racial discrimination.

The Secretary-General of the Supreme African Sports Council, Jean-Claude Ganga, said he would admit white South Africans to the African Games provided that competitions in South Africa are held without racial discrimination.

Eight years later (1976), Tanzania refused to go when the International Olympic Committee (IOC) ignored demands to be expelled because their rugby team was touring the banned South Africa. On the eve of the opening ceremony, Ganga called a boycott of 21 other African countries, joined by Iraq and Guyana.

The Secretary-General of the Supreme African Sports Council, Jean-Claude Ganga/sahistory.org
The Secretary-General of the Supreme African Sports Council, Jean-Claude Ganga/sahistory.org

Source: sahistory.org

Compiled By: REFILWE GAESWE