Today in History

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Events of this day in the South African history/Twitter

2011     Libyan leader, Muammar Gaddafi is killed

The Libyan leader, Muammar Gaddafi was found in a drain in his home town of Sirte and killed following the eight month long uprising in Lybia. According to reports Gaddafi died from wounds to his head and legs. It was unclear whether this happened when a NATO air strike hit a convoy fleeing Sirte, a fire fight on the ground, or while hiding in a drain. His death came after end of September deadline set by United Nations for NATO troops to leave Libya. The Libyan Rebellion began on 15 February 2011 and gained momentum each passing day. In March the rebels gained an upper hand as NATO declared Libya a no fly zone.

African leaders came with what they called African road map for peace, a plan first proposed during Jacob Zuma’s earlier trip to Lybia. The African road map called for an immediate cease-fire, including a halt to NATO bombing, international supervision of the truce, and negotiations between Tripoli and the rebels on a political settlement. His death marked an end to his dream of the United States of Africa and his 24 year reign in Libya.

Muammar Gaddafi/sahistory.org
Muammar Gaddafi/sahistory.org

1999     Former diplomat and Director of Foreign Affairs Jackie Selebi is set to lead SAPS

The South African government announced that former diplomat and Director of Foreign Affairs, Jacob Sello Selebi, would take over from the outgoing South African Police Services (SAPS) national commissioner, George Fivaz, with effect from 1 January 2000. Selebi was appointed by President Thabo Mbeki.

Jackie Selebi/sahistory.org
Jackie Selebi/sahistory.org

1994   President Mandela warns disgruntled former Umkhonto we Sizwe combatants

The newly elected President of the Republic of South Africa, Nelson Mandela warned disgruntled former uMkhonto weSizwe (MK) combatants, who took leave without permission while being integrated into the new South African army. Mandela told the former MK members that they have to adhere to military discipline or face the consequences of their actions.

Nelson Mandela/sahistory.org
Nelson Mandela/sahistory.org

1988   South African model, Candice Swanepoel is born in Mooi River, KwaZulu-Natal

Candice Swanepoel was born in Mooi River, KwaZulu-Natal on 20 October 1988.  She grew up on a farm and had aspirations of becoming a ballerina. Swanepoel did not think of herself as beautiful, even though she was thin and tall. She never dreamed of becoming a model. At the age of fifteen she was scouted in a mall in Durban. Swanepoel’s career skyrocketed very fast after she was discovered. She became the first South African Victoria’s Secret model. She is among the top earning models in the world, taking the number nine spot on Forbes’ list of 2013.

 

Candice Swanepoel/sahistory.org/hollywoodneuz.com
Candice Swanepoel/sahistory.org/hollywoodneuz.com

1946   Political activist, Dr Yusuf Dadoo is re-elected President of Transvaal Indian Congress

A son of a wealthy businessman, Yusuf Dadoo was all too familiar with the repressive political and social conditions that the Indian community lived under during segregation and apartheid. Educated in London, and later Edinburgh, Dadoo returned to South Africa in 1936, well-versed in Marxist literature and determined to mobilize a national liberation movement.

Dr Yusuf Dadoo/sahistory.com
Dr Yusuf Dadoo/sahistory.com

1915    The Second General Election is held in the Union of SA

The second general election was held in the Union of South Africa with the National Party (NP) participating for the first time. The main point at issue was whether South Africa should continue to support Britain’s war effort and the results was a clear indication of the growth of Afrikaner nationalism. The party managed to make their political existence felt when it emerged as the third largest party, with twenty-seven seats in the Union Parliament. It secured seven in the Cape Province, sixteen in the Orange Free State and four in the Transvaal. The results for the other political parties counted as follows: South African Party fifty-four seats; the Unionists thirty-nine; four for the Labour Party, while independent candidates won six. General Louis Botha again became prime minister, but many of his followers voted for the new party under General J.B.M Hertzog.

1910 South Africa/sahistory.org
1910 South Africa/sahistory.org

Source: sahistory.org

Compiled By: REFILWE GAESWE